Archives For Ajax

I was speaking with some of our developers last night about a mobile web options like jQTouch, jQuery Mobile, Sencha Touch. And then we started talking about Backbone.js. I first heard about Backbone last week from a prospective client who mentioned they use it with PhoneGap to create their apps. I guess I’m late to the table on this one, but in case you haven’t seen Backbone.js either, check out these great examples from their site:

Jérôme Gravel-Niquet has contributed a Todo List application that is bundled in the repository as Backbone example.

Todos

DocumentCloud

The DocumentCloud workspace is built on Backbone.js, with Documents, Projects,Notes, and Accounts all as Backbone models and collections.

LinkedIn Mobile

LinkedIn used Backbone.js to create its next-generation HTML5 mobile web app.

Flow

MetaLab used Backbone.js to create Flow, a task management app for teams.

AudioVroom

AudioVroom is a free music streaming app that allows you to listen to your Facebook friends like radio stations.

Foursquare

Foursquare is a fun little startup that helps you meet up with friends, discover new places, and save money.

Do

Do is a social productivity app that makes it easy to work on tasks, track projects, and take notes with your team.

Groupon Now!

Groupon Now! helps you find local deals that you can buy and use right now.

Basecamp Mobile

37Signals used Backbone.js to create Basecamp Mobile, the mobile version of their popular project management software.

Slavery Footprint

Slavery Footprint allows consumers to visualize how their consumption habits are connected to modern-day slavery and provides them with an opportunity
to have a deeper conversation with the companies that manufacture the goods they purchased.

Trajectory

Trajectory is an agile software planning tool used to discuss wireframes, record decisions made, relate user stories and bugs to discussions, and track your progress and plan the future.

SoundCloud Mobile

SoundCloud is the leading sound sharing platform on the internet.

Pandora

When Pandora redesigned their site in HTML5, they chose Backbone.js to help manage the user interface and interactions.

CloudApp

CloudApp is simple file and link sharing for the Mac.

SeatGeek

SeatGeek‘s stadium ticket maps were originally developed with Prototype.js. Moving to Backbone.js and jQuery helped organize
a lot of the UI code, and the increased structure has made adding features a lot easier. SeatGeek is also in the process of building a mobile
interface that will be Backbone.js from top to bottom.

Talking Points Memo: Baroque

Baroque is the editor currently powering the homepage of Talking Points Memo.

Grove.io

Grove.io provides hosted IRC for teams.

Kicksend

Kicksend is a real-time file sharing platform that helps everyday people send and receive files of any size
with their friends and family.

Shortmail

410 Labs uses Backbone.js at Shortmail.com to build a fast and responsive inbox, driven by the Router.

Battlefield Play4Free

Battlefield Play4Free is the latest free-to-play first person shooter from the same team that
created Battlefield Heroes.

Salon.io

Salon.io provides a space where photographers, artists and designers freely arrange their visual art on virtual walls.

Quote Roller

Coding Staff used Backbone.js to create Quote Roller, an application that helps to create, send, organize and track business proposals with ease.

TileMill

Our fellow Knight Foundation News Challenge winners, MapBox, created an open-source map design studio with Backbone.js: TileMill.

rround.me

rround.me uses the HTML Geolocation API to discover tweets, YouTube videos, Instagram photos, Foursquare spots, and other happenings
posted by people close to you.

Blossom

Blossom is a lightweight project management tool for lean teams.

Insta-great!

Elliott Kember and Hector Simpson built Insta-great! – a fun way to explore popular photos and interact with Instagram on the web.

Decide

Decide.com helps people decide when to buy consumer electronics.

Trello

Trello is a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards.

BitTorrent

BitTorrent used Backbone to completely rework an existing Win32 UI.

Fluxiom

Fluxiom uses Backbone.js and HTML5 to deliver a seamless upload experience from the desktop to the cloud, including drag and drop, live previews, partial uploads, and one-click sharing.

Chop

Chop is a little app from ZURB that lets people slice up bad code and share their feedback to help put it back together.

Blackcomb

Opzi used Backbone.js to create Blackcomb, a web-based platform for collaboration applications.

QuietWrite

James Yu used Backbone.js to create QuietWrite, an app that gives writers a clean and quiet interface to concentrate on the text itself.

Tzigla

Cristi Balan and Irina Dumitrascu created Tzigla, a collaborative drawing application where artists make tiles that connect to each other to
create surreal drawings.

Harvest, the time tracking and invoicing tool we use, just added a new filter mechanism to their report generator. While I appreciate the additional functionality, I was most impressed with their multi-select combobox. It looks like a normal text field, but once the field has focus you can select any option and it will be added into the field, click again and you can select another option, building up any number of options. The field just gets larger (more rows are added) when you add more options than can be displayed in a single row.

It is equally easy to remove items from the field by clicking the little ‘x’ next to each option.

Does anyone know if there is a JQuery control for this? That would be awesome. A Flex control like this would be nice too, just in case there are any motivated developers reading this (wink, wink)…

Update: Rajesh Rajappan provided a link to the JQuery control: http://loopj.com/jquery-tokeninput/. It has autocomplete with multi selection.

Update again: Harvest released this control called “Chosen’, it is available here: http://harvesthq.github.com/chosen/

New article on InsideRIA today:
Top Ajax Technologies and RIA Frameworks
I posted a fairly comprehensive list of RIA frameworks and Ajax technologies rated on:

  • Completeness of their UI control set, based on the list of essential controls
  • Usability of the controls
  • Aesthetics, based on the default visual design

I also included some examples of applications built with the top frameworks and technologies:

RIA Screen Layouts

February 11, 2010 — Leave a comment

Last year I posted an article on 12 Standard Screen Patterns. It has been incredibly popular so I updated it for 2010. The full article is at UX Magazine. Check out the article and take a look at the 15 standard layouts and examples from more than 80 current RIAs:

Look for the upcoming post (Thursday, Dec 10) in InsideRIA.com about 28 Rich Data Visualization Tools. I’ve included the first three to whet your appetite.

Ajax.org

Ajax.org Platform is a pure javascript application framework for creating real-time collaborative applications that run in the browser.

AjaxOrg.png

AnyChart

AnyChart is a flexible Flash based solution that allows you to create interactive and great looking flash charts.

Axiis

Axiis is a Data Visualization Framework for Flex. It has been designed to be a concise, expressive, and modular framework that let developers and designers create compelling data visualization solutions.

Also, take a look at the nice window-in-window design on the saturnboy blog.

Check out Design GalleRIA– A design gallery and showcase of the best Rich Internet Applications. I add a couple of new ones each week. Please comment with your favorite RIAs (Ajax, Flex, Silverlight, Laszlo…). My goal is 100+ by the end of 2009!

Presented on Nov 3, 2009 at Øredev in Malmo, Sweden.

What is the fastest way to get from a product idea to a rich internet application? By breaking down the communication barriers between designers and developers.

This talk takes a quick look at how to build a shared vocabulary and use prototyping to bypass extensive wireframes and development specs.

Take a look at 5 simple and effective prototyping tools:

  • Balsamiq Mock-ups + Nakpee
  • Any wireframes + Protoscript
  • Prototcasting (using click-throughs and screencasts to convey requirements)
  • Atlas and other development environments + visual layout editors

.

My co-author Bill Scott is sharing his newly rewritten talk on Designing for Interesting Moments. Given at Microsoft in Redmond, Ruby Meetup Group at CMU/Moffett Field & The Ajax Experience 2009.

Overview: Did you know that there are at least 16 different moments of interaction during drag and drop? And that there are at least a half-dozen elements on the page that conspire with these points in time to form a drag and drop interaction? With almost all user interactions there are lots of interesting moments that you can use to enhance the user experience — or worse to create confusion in the user’s mind.

In this talk, Bill slows down time and puts dozens of interactions under the microscope to study what works and what doesn’t work when creating interactive applications. Nuances from 80+ examples illustrate both what should be emulated (design patterns and best practice tips) as well as what should be avoided (design anti-patterns).

These are conveniently summarized in six over-arching design principles.

* Input where you output.
* Require a light footprint.
* Maintain flow.
* Invite interaction.
* Show transitions
* Be reactive.

This talk goes hand-in-hand with our book, Designing Web Interfaces and will provide you with dozens of clear take-aways for designing rich interactions on the web.

New featured article on InsideRIA, 50 Most Usable RIAs.

Excerpt

Bill and I have reviewed hundreds of rich Internet applications, RIAs, while compiling examples for our book and subsequent presentations and articles.

We recently realized that we had amassed quite a list of applications. Thinking other designers and developers might be interested in these resources, we applied two simple criteria to identify the top fifty:

Number 1: Does it adhere to the 10 basic usability principles?
Number 2: Is it really rich? Developing a product with Ajax, Flex, or Silverlight doesn’t inherently make it rich. A usable RIA will embody these six principles: Make it Direct, Keep it Lightweight, Stay on the Page, Provide Invitations, Use Transitions, React Immediately. For more detailed descriptions of each principle, see the Explore the Book section of this site.

10 of the 50

Aviary

aviary1

Balsamiq Mockups

balsamiq_mockups

CrazyEgg

crazyegg

Mint

mint_small

Picnik

picnik

SlideRocket

sliderocket_small

Spatial Key

spatialkey_layers

Tumblr

tumblr

Whitestone Cheese

whitestone

Wufoo

wufoo

Fluency and Rosenfeld Media sponsored the first DelveUI, A 2 Day Masterclass on Designing User (Web) Interfaces last week at the NYU Poly Campus in Brooklyn.

I had an opportunity to speak about my favorite topic: design patterns and principles for rich applications. The talk is titled Designing Rich Applications– and illustrates the need for richness at four levels:

  • application structure
  • screen layout
  • selecting rich UI controls
  • interactions


I’m working on a nifty little flip book that has all of the application patterns, screen patterns, rich UI controls and interaction patterns. All the patterns are on index cards and you can carry it into design sessions- and flip through it for inspiration- or to find a certain pattern. tangible-ria-patterns

ria-flip-book1

Let me know if you think this would be useful.